Adventures on a Single Page - a tabletop RPG for kids and after school programs

Adventures on a Single Page – quick and creative tabletop RPG stories for kids!

Adventures on a Single Page is a tabletop RPG storyline that was designed specifically for playing with kids in an after school program!  It offers modular 1-page adventures that still fit together to create a full adventure arc and will fit into a 1 hour session!

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Adventures on a Single Page aimed at all ages of tabletop RPG players:

Adventures on a Single Page is intended to be used with the Sodalitas system but can be used with other systems as well since these are story modules.  I’ve already reviewed Sodalitas if you want more details on the system’s accessibility, so, for this review, I’ll focus on how Adventures on a Single Page’s tabletop RPG stories fit for kids. 

The adventures here are whimsical and fun while giving players options on what path to take.  Although you can do battle (usually against creatures like zombies), there are a variety of encounters that include both non-combat options or alternatives and lots of fun action that doesn’t revolve around fighting.  These tabletop RPG adventures are written with the intent to be engaging for school kids, and my kid, who is about 4 years old, enjoyed playing these and could follow most of the plot even though he’s on the young side.  I’d say these fall into the all-ages tabletop RPG category with plenty of flexibility for parents or teachers to adjust the level of combat or type of encounter options available to fit their kids’ specific needs.

Setting for Adventures on a Single Page bringing a unique feel to fantasy tabletop RPGs:

Adventures on a Single Page is set in a wonderful fantasy world that spans a map filled with wizard towers, zombie infested jungles, a joyous kobold village, and more, giving it a feel that’s familiar to fantasy tabletop RPG lovers but with a fun and colorful spin to make the setting unique and engaging for kids.

Your young players will get to try out tons of different adventures and locations across the game’s map, leading them to explore ruins, track down a mysterious creature, discover a strange island, and find out all the other cool hidden secrets these adventures have to offer.  Adventures on a Single Page is set to be fast paced, intriguing, and fun with lots of space for kids to satiate their curiosity.

Adventures on a Single Page is set to be fast paced, intriguing, and fun with lots of space for kids to satiate their curiosity.

Your character in Adventures on a Single Page (and Sodalitas):  

If you’re using the Sodalitas system, your character can be anything you want them to be!  There’s lots more details here, but, in essence, kids have the freedom to make characters be exactly who they want AND they are extremely easy to track.  

Since Adventures on a Single Page was designed to run with a whole bunch of young players in short sessions, character creation and skill use needed to be clear, concise, and easy to use.  Pairing these stories with their intended system, Sodalitas, does just that.  I can 100% see Adventures on a Single Page being used with other systems (D&D or Pathfinder are the popular examples that I know a lot of people look for), and these stories will definitely fit there as well, but I do highly recommend trying with Sodalitas based on how well the characters creation and use is handled.

Mechanics built into Adventures on a Single Page’s tabletop RPG stories:

The single page tabletop RPG adventure layout: 

The biggest feature of Adventures on a Single Page is in how well it lives up to its namesake.  Each adventure really does fit into a single page, and it’s easy to quickly run adventures with little to no preparation (so this is perfect for busy teachers or parents to fit into their schedules). 

Graphics are used well to draw attention to key areas and visually understand what’s going on, so you aren’t getting just a page of solid text, yet so much is included in each page.  There’s roll tables, character descriptions, maps, and quest details where needed and no real extra information to clutter the module.  It is very clear that each page and scene was carefully thought through to make it accessible for whoever is running the game in addition to making the adventures themselves aimed at kids.

15 modular adventures to fit school schedules:

There are 15 modules in Adventures on a Single Page’s first season, making it the perfect length to run a weekly game across the span of a school semester.  In addition, these are intended by the creator to be used in short sessions, so you know going in that you’re set up for enough content for about 1 hour of gameplay without having to worry about leaving a ton of unexplored material on the table to revisit next time.  Each section of the story is also modular, so you can end session 10 with a few open elements but still progress right into session 11 next week without worrying about story continuity or keeping different sections of your group aligned.

Adventures on a Single Page - 15 modules for running tabletop RPGs with kids after school

All of these elements make Adventures on a Single Page perfect for regularly scheduled games for young kids at home or for after school or mid-lunch clubs to balance getting to explore while also keeping the pace up so everyone both stays interested and within what time is available.

Unique adventure elements to keep kids on their toes: 

Another, maybe small, feature that I really like about Adventures on a Single Page is that there’s almost mini-mechanics that are occasionally introduced.  Things like an invasion countdown or a heist alarm to provide tension are sometimes added to one of the modules.  

I like this because I think it helps to make each session a little more interesting and keeps everyone on their toes – players need to adapt to the new mini-mechanic that is introduced, so it feels like they’re beating a new type of game.  They’re learning something different, and, even though the changes are small and maybe easy to pick up, the game is always changing. This teaches kids adaptability in addition to it just being fun.

What did my kid think of Adventures on a Single Page?

My kid really enjoyed the stories in Adventures on a Single Page!  We played adventure  #2 The Artefact, which focused on a Kobold village and a temple that was home to the Big White Worm, and we played adventure #14 Wizard Tower For Sale, which had us climbing up a tower full of strange and magical rooms!

We played each of the two Adventures on a Single Page modules that we picked for about an hour, and there was plenty to keep my kid busy and having fun!

We played each of the two Adventures on a Single Page modules that we picked for about an hour, and there was plenty to keep my kid busy and having fun!  He had lots of questions about the locations and the pictures, but we also still moved on at a pretty good place to complete most of the adventure – there’s always some unexplored bits in a tabletop RPG, but we hit probably 90% of the material.  My kid was engaged the whole time, and he really wants to run the Zombies in the Jungle adventure the next time we have an SRD that doesn’t come with a premade story!

My overall thoughts on Adventures on a Single Page as a tabletop RPG for kids:

Adventures on a Single Page has some awesome stories that can be used with any system (but again, I recommend using with Sodalitas) as part of a series of easy to use and modular tabletop RPG adventures with kids!  They are well laid out, creative, and engaging with intentional accessibility to kids and teachers.  I enjoyed playing these adventures with my kid, and I hope you get to try them out too!

Where to find a copy of Adventures on a Single Page:

Adventures on a Single Page can be found here on itch.io!

Also, check out Sodalitas for the companion SRD to these adventures!

Adventures on a Single Page - a tabletop RPG for kids and after school programs

This game was a lot of fun, and I hope you get the chance to check it out!  If you do, please let me know in the comments below what your thoughts are!

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